Productivity tips for bloggers!

Over the last month (July), I’ve been more productive than I ever have since I started this blog. You know I’m all about growth and that’s what keeps me going every day. Over the course of July and the beginning of August, I’ve gone back and created a batch of content.

My traffic did take a dip because I wasn’t creating new content.

So over the last month, I focused a lot of my efforts on Pinterest and content creation. And my efforts are beginning to pay off with this:

  • I see a rise in my traffic again, including two spikes in traffic (Oh, don’t we all love those spike days?)
  • My boards are ranking higher on Pinterest (more on that in another post)
  • I can even see some of my pins ranking higher
  • Published almost 20 blog posts in one month that were between 1000-3000 words

I love seeing how baby steps can help build momentum. I love strategies, but honestly, they can be really draining and so far-fetching when you can’t look three months ahead.

So today, I wanted to share with you why and what I exactly do to be more productive. And over the last month or two, following my intuition has been the most important thing that helped me keep my sanity.

Wear earplugs when you need to focus.

This was actually a copywriting tip I learned from a copywriter. When you’re producing good, purposeful writing, you really need to silence the noise out there. Whether you’re inside your home, a coffee shop, or someone out there in the world. If you know anything about copywriting, it’s about being clear over clever any day.

So a few months ago, I picked up these ear plugs from Target and have been wearing them when I’m working. This physical barrier really mentally fences you off from the world to just focus.

It’s only $3 and you get about 10 ear plugs and even a travel container if you want to use it on the go.

I swear… this isn’t sponsored. As you can tell, I rarely talk about physical products on this blog anyway.

Listen to your intuition when possible.

I know a lot about blogging can be about analytics, stats, metrics, and acting based on what those data tell you. I’ve always been more of a logical person than an emotional one.

But when it comes to blogging (and many things in life), intuition plays such a huge role. When I don’t follow my intuition, I realize I’m going against my flow. And when I’m going against my flow, I feel a ton of friction — and that leads to demotivation. And when that happens, guess what?

I don’t get a lot done. And even when I do, I feel exhausted afterward.

Find your flow.

Everyone’s path is going to be different. You might be more prone to listening to advice. You might want someone to tell you what to do. But the truth is, someone else’s experiences can be a good guide or resource for experimentation, but until you have implemented and tested it, don’t fall for what other people call their “truths.”

This kind of goes back to following your intuition and your flow.

Don’t be afraid to invest in courses to move you ahead of the game.

Nothing replaces taking action and doing the actual work, but taking courses can help you get the knowledge to do the work.

If you can afford to, take the paid course over piecing information together. The reason for this is because on your journey to find all the information to put the puzzle together, you’ll have to sort through so much noise.

And it’s less about the time it takes to sort through all the information (whether it’s reliable or not), but it’s more about how much it mentally drains you. You have to consistently ask yourself, “should I trust this person?”

Most courses have money-back guarantees and if the course doesn’t work for you, you can always get a refund. I’ve personally never experienced a course bad enough that I needed a refund.

I do pay attention to their refund policy, but what I trust and follow more is my intuition. I just know it. I also know that my connection to the course creator has a lot of weight on how likely I’m going to do the work.

Revisit what works for you and keep doing more of it.

Likewise, revisit what doesn’t work and get rid of it. Even if that thing works for someone else.

Like I said before, following your gut can really go far and help you silence the noise out there. I felt like I’ve understood how Pinterest works intuitively in the last month just by being on the platform every day. When you take courses, it gives you the domain knowledge and some “facts”, but if you don’t “play the game”, you’ll never fully grasp it.

Because social media and engagement can be such a nuanced event, you always want to keep pulse on how your audience responds to your content. When you keep pulse, you can directly respond to what you should do more of and what to do less of. And if something really falls flat for you, get rid of it. I would use a two-week frame to test how things work for you.

Related: How to Find Time to Blog When You’re Slammed

Consume less and produce more.

Do you know that productivity is more about producing your own work than reading others work?

When you consume less content, you’re already putting a fence around what you don’t allow into your world.

When you’re reading less about others, you’re also less likely to compare yourself, your traffic and sales to someone else’s.

This helps silence your thoughts and gives you more energy to focus on content creation, social media marketing or something else that’s important in your blogging journey.

Some people say time is more important than money because you’ll never get it back if you spend it on the wrong thing. But I think energy is even more important than time because if you spend it on the wrong thing, it can have a downward spiral effect on you.

Break down your goals to make them more achievable on Trello.

Or Asana, whichever one you prefer.

I’ve been using Trello for over a year now, but only over the last few months did I truly use it to break down every small task and project. I do find that the check boxes on Trello have a positive reinforcement on me. I feel awesome when I can swiftly check something off. Like a boss.

My two most common boards are “Editorial Calendar” for content creation and “Grow my Pinterest” for designing pins and optimizing my account. This will shift depending on what you focus on. When you really get serious about blogging, you know how much goes into one blog post.

I’ve actually written an entire article on how I batch my content creation process. That’s how I’ve been able to write almost 20 posts in a one month period!

I’ve written consistently 1000+ words blog posts over the last month and it seems like I no longer have writer’s block anymore! It’s amazing how consistency can pay off in surprising ways.

These days, I can finish a 1000+ words article and be like, “That’s it? Wow that was quick!”

In fact, I’ve also found a new blog on minimal living and whipped up 10 blog posts on a whim in less than a week. When you find your flow, it’s much easier to continue building and adding to the momentum that’s already there.

Woot, woot!

Dare to do something different in your niche.

I do believe that when you do something different that people will also respond to, it really sets you apart and stay top of mind. I experimented with this in a few ways, but can’t say I’ve found my sweet spot yet.

When you begin to stand out, that’s when you truly begin to not care about the noise out there. At this point, you don’t even need to silence the noise because you know your own path.

Related: How to Overcome Your Fears of Blogging and Start Kicking Ass

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8 ways to silence the noise in the blogging world | productivity tips for bloggers

Some last words…

Do you constantly feel like you’re pulled in many different directions because you’re following too much advice out there? Are you reading more than creating?

If so, what have you found to be effective to get rid of the noise? What are your best productivity tips?

Until next time,

Judy

Author: Ju

Ju is a copywriting ninja for creative entrepreneurs. She also helps bloggers with their content strategy to grow their audience, customers, and online presence.